UKIP unveils ‘Fresh ideas for London’

Lawrence Webb is the UKIP Mayoral candidate
Scrapping the congestion charge and introducing 20 minutes free parking across London are some of the ideas being put forward by UKIP’s Mayor of London and London Assembly campaign.

The party has published a mini-manifesto which will form part of their offer to voters.

Other ideas include cutting business rates for companies employing local people and exempting all new taxis from VAT.

Lawrence Webb, UKIP Mayor candidate, said: “UKIP is offering Londoners a fresh choice in the capital.

“Already much of the media are focusing on the two-horse race of Boris versus Ken, but it should be remembered that there are also places up for grabs on the London Assembly.

“A vote for UKIP in London would result in the party taking some of those places and holding those that run the capital to account.”

Other parties contesting the Assembly elections include Labour, the Conservatives, the Liberal Democrats and the Green party.

Comments

  1. Robin says

    excellent, we need incentives to build on brown field sites,and KKeeping ”Green Ring” around London.
    Airport why not Expand Northolt? and Manston,Kent? build another runway at Gatwick…Johnson and camoron are whistling in wind destroying Isle of sheppey’s Eco-system. Build a rail connecting Gatwick,Sussex to Heathrow,Middlesex

  2. Gary Rogers says

    The above is clearly what London needs, “common sense” policies, only UKIP now, can offer London and Londoner’s any real change.

  3. Damian Hockney says

    For some reason I cannot seem to find any reference to the mini manifesto online or in web searches. However, I would make the point that the idea of scrapping the Congestion Charge has to be costed and to take into account the contractual arrangements. These are fairly onerous! Similarly, on the question of taxis, the London Mayor does not control VAT. It is not even Westminster. It is down to the EU how VAT is levied. Governments which take advantage of temporary exemptions and cuts in VAT always have to give something to the EU in return. Usually a ratchet of further control over national policy in some aspect or other which the EU is demanding.

    It would possibly help if UKIP produced a costed vision for London. The party is in an ideal position because, however eclectic its membership, it does have certain threads of campaigning which are at variance with all the other parties and which strike a chord with the electorate. A proper vision set out relating to the issues Londoners care about would concentrate the party’s thoughts and strategy. There will be nobody else doing it.

    The party will be barred from most media, of course (and I will not bang on, yet again, about that here) but it is useful if it were to set down a marker and spend some resources on such a vision. Its Assembly team appear to have some weight and seriousness. It would help if the party could just creep into the Assembly to be a voice for that vision, which is supported a high percentage of Londoners.

  4. Robin says

    Well put Mr Hockney…UKIP’s membership is erclectic certainly, Some of the notorious infighting has ceased. Even with Stupid goons who want to be a branch of The Tories…At least we have Youngest candidates this time. The original policy of abolishing EU inspired GLA city hall, seems to have quietly died.As has the ridiculous nonsense of carving up UK into EU English regions.
    We have potential,presence at most Universities.
    Some of the elected MEP’s dont seem to appreciate need to attract ‘Moderate greens” and ”Old Labour” voters bearing in mind London’s population is fluid, example when i sttod for Local election, 2002,2006,2010 x2 45% of electoral rolll changed in each 4 year span!..Also 6million voters or potential electorate are not registered. UKIP’s common sense membership can chime in because we all have had ”Real jobs” even though Unlike in 2004 GLA when we had, butchers,bakers,Bus drivers,HGV drivers, we need more ‘Blue collar” members or it becomes ”Too jolly hockey sticks” and turns off voters outside Watford. Minor criticism, but i shall e doing my ”Foot soldiering” for UKIP.

  5. A. Man says

    Given the problems the congestion charge sought to address (congestion, pollution) what is to be gained from scrapping it and what, in its place, will address those problems?

    I’m open-minded, but don’t think just scrapping it because it’s unpopular and because doing so might win votes, without addressing the problems with alternative solutions (or explaining why no solutions are needed), is necessarily the right move.

    Where can I read UKIP’s thoughts on this matter?

    Thanks.

  6. Damian Hockney says

    UKIP appears to have some good candidates on the list, but the problem with the manifesto is that it is a wish list of things, many of which neither the Mayor nor Assembly can do anything about. It mentions VAT several times (scrapping it on some things, lowering it on others) but of course as well all know, not even the Westminster parliament is permitted to do this (let alone City Hall). The EU decides whether to agree temporary arrangements to lower the tax (and always asks for something in return). And scrapping VAT is just not an option anywhere as the EU simply will not agree that. Any manifesto including such policies must explain that you are calling for something that you cannot under any circumstances implement (and explain why, surely?).

  7. A. Man says

    Damian Hockney (April 12, 2012 at 11:02 am), I assume that the UKIP mean that they will enact such policy changes after withdrawing from the EU, so the EU would not be able to prevent them. This does, of course, require they are elected to government which could be possible if they are popular enough to gain power in the GLA. I disagree with your point that they cannot “under any circumstances implement” the policy, but to do so would require winning more than the London Mayoral election

  8. Damian Hockney says

    Take your point A.Man, but this is an election for a London Mayor. If you have policies which you cannot, under any circumstances as London Mayor, implement then you lose credibility as a candidate. The office of London Mayor cannot, under any circumstances, implement a policy of reducing or removing VAT, can it? UKIP misses a trick by not spelling this out, and if it did so it would be able to take the opportunity to tell people (because they still do not know) that a UK government cannot remove VAT or reduce it without the permission of the EU. A manifesto for an election like this should surely not just be a wish list of national desires based upon a policy for a General Election.